communication

Are traditional websites an endangered species?

Social ecosystem2

There is no doubt that social media has changed the way we engage with content online. People are turning to social channels for more than “social” engagement; they are turning to social for news, current events, and product information and sentiment. In an effort to meet both current and potential customers in their preferred social platform, brands and publishers are responding to this trend by providing native content that is channel appropriate, and mobile optimized.

As digital marketers, should we begin to consider a world where the traditional website, largely considered the proverbial home base for a brand’s content, takes a back seat to an ecosystem of social channels that deliver contextually appropriate content in their customers’ preferred formats and channels?

It’s already happening. Obsessee.com is delivering fashion and culture content to teens solely through their social channels. Similarly, NowThisNews.com is providing news to its audience natively through a variety of social channels. In both cases, their “homepages,” should you make your way there, are simply landing pages with links to their social channels.

This approach is interesting for multiple reasons. By placing their content on social media, brands and publishers can:

  • target their audiences and provide them with native content that is contextually appropriate
  • simplify the user experience by doing away with the click-through, which on mobile, can result in slow load times and engagement drop-off
  • side-step ad blockers. No need for display advertising since the content itself will be served

As I create my first native post on LinkedIn, I ask myself: Are traditional websites an endangered species, destined to become portals for true audience engagement? What are your thoughts?

This post was originally posted on my LinkedIn profile:
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/traditional-websites-endangered-species-ivan-ruiz

At the crossroads of health, wellness, technology, and marketing

2015 Marketing Summit Template

It was a privilege to attend the 2015 Marketing Summit hosted by Ogilvy CommonHealth and eConsultancy. As the producer at the event, I was able to spend some time with each of the presenters. I was also able to hit the 10,000-step mark on my Fitbit by 3pm – I’ll circle back to wearables later. I was most impressed by the diversity of speakers that are playing at the crossroads of health, wellness, technology, and marketing. The people I met and the messages I heard made me extremely excited on two different fronts: as a human-being, and as a marketer.

As a human-being, I was excited about the ideas surrounding personalized health that we heard throughout the day – especially since I moonlight as a fitness instructor.

Among them was Jeff Arnold from Sharecare, who is empowering consumers to take charge of their health by delivering personalized resources and expert advice through their online health profiles. Melissa Bojorquez, of Physicians Interactive, talked to us about technology’s unique power to help people connect with each other, and in doing so, defying the isolation and fear that accompany serious health conditions. Bill Evans from Watson Health showed us how Watson is changing the face of medical research with its ability to “read” thousands of medical journals and white papers in unimaginable speeds in an effort to increase the safety and efficacy of clinical trials drugs.

Our Healthcare Startup Sharktank brought innovative thinking to the forefront of consumer health. Movi Interactive is incentivizing fitness tracker users in unique ways by gamifying their experiences to drive usage. Through their platform, Medprowellness is connecting consumers with clinicians, nutritionists, and personal trainers to provide a personalized layer of accountability to their 360-degree approach to health and wellness.

The marketer in me was excited about all the new ways data will continue to fuel our insights. Finding new ways to visualize data is critical, according to David Davenport Firth, particularly since 75% of physicians admit to not understanding the statistics in journals. Back to the topic of wearbles… For a while now, marketers have been talking about the endless data streams being collected from wearables. Patrick Henshaw and his startup, Strap, can aggregate data from wearables, smartphones, and other apps, allowing marketers to draw insights from real-time human data. On similar note, there was Pranav Yadav, whose company Neuro-Insight can help marketers and brands optimize their creative by analyzing the neuro-responses of their consumers.

We are at the crossroads of health, wellness, technology, and marketing. Ryan Olohan from Google reinforced the fact that like all successful companies, healthcare brands need to innovate or die. Companies like Kodak and Blockbuster didn’t, while companies like Uber and Expedia have changed their respective industries forever. As marketers in the healthcare space, we all need to look beyond our comfort zones. We need to encourage our brands to look beyond, as well.

Infographic: Smartphone Use Among Physicians

In my first of a series of infographics on Digital Health, I look at smartphone use as a metric of digital acceptance and adoption among physicians. Like us, physicians are unquestionably connected through their smartphones, and are conditioned to receive digital content. The newest generation of physicians entering the field are digital natives, and do not know a world without the internet or constant connectivity. These physicians will play a huge role in shaping the future of digital health. The key will be to understand how and when to best reach them, and those are topics we’ll cover in future posts.

Smartphone use among physicians
Smartphone use among physicians